Page 106. " De Valera's men "

The cell in which Eamon de Valera was held at Kilmainham Gaol
Public DomainThe cell in which Eamon de Valera was held at Kilmainham Gaol - Credit: Hunter Kahn
Eamon de Valera was a giant in Irish politics for over half a century. Serving multiple terms as the head of government and head of state, he is credited with a leading role in the development of the Constitution of Ireland. De Valera was an important leader of the Irish struggle for independence from the United Kingdom, and the anti-Treaty opposition in the Irish Civil War. He founded Fianna Fail in 1926, the largest political party in Ireland.

 

Page 106. " property of William Martin Murphy "

Journalist and businessman William Martin Murphy was the MP for St Patrick's, Dublin from 1885 to 1892. He was dubbed William Murder Murphy by the media and the workers of Dublin due to the Dublin Lockout of 1913.

 

Page 109. " Thomas Ashe and Dick Mulcahy "
Thomas Ashe was a member of the Gaelic League, Irish Republican Brotherhood and a founding member of the Irish Volunteers. During the Easter Rising, Ashe commanded the Fingal battalion of the Irish Volunteers. Ashe's force of 60-70 men won a major victory in Ashbourne, County Meath. Ashe's battalion surrendered on the orders of Patrick Pearse, 24 hours after the Rising collapsed. On 8 May 1916 Ashe was sentenced to death, a sentence which was later altered to penal servitude for life, which he served in Lewes Prison, England. On 18 June 1917 Ashe was released due to accounts of prisoner mistreatment appearing in the Irish press. Following his release, Thomas Ashe took part in numerous speaking engagements. In August 1917 he was arrested following a speech in Ballinalee, County Longford, convicted of sedition and sentenced to two years hard labour. Whilst imprisoned Ashe went on hunger strike, beginning on 20 September, to demand prisoner-of-war status. He died five days later. 

 

Page 109. " Michael Mallin... Stephen's Green "

Michael Mallin was second in command of the Irish Citizen Army, and commanded the garrison at St Stephen's Green. On Sunday, 30 April 1916, Mallin surrendered when ordered to do so by Connolly. Michael Mallin was executed in Kilmainham Gaol by firing squad on 8 May 1916.

 

Page 110. " Aud was sunk in Queenstown harbour "

Cobhpier, Queenstown Harbour
Public DomainCobhpier, Queenstown Harbour - Credit: Fish Cop
Aud was the cover name of a German ship, Libau, that carried arms to Ireland as part of the preparation for the 1916 Easter Rising.

 

 

 

Page 110. " Jim Larkin had landed "
Jim Larkin
Public DomainJim Larkin - Credit: Thpohl
Jim Larkin was an Irish trade union leader and socialist. He was the founder of the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union and the Irish Labour Party. Larkin played a significant role in the 1913 Dublin Lockout.

 

Page 111. " the Starry Plough "

The Starry Plough
Public DomainThe Starry Plough - Credit: Pauric
The Starry Plough was the banner of the Irish Citizen Army. James Connolly said that the significance of the banner was that a free Ireland would control its own destiny from the plough to the stars. The Starry Plough was flown by the Irish Citizen Army during the 1916 Easter Rising.

 

Page 116. " Oh thunder and lightening is no lark... And view the zoological gardens "

(The Dubliners singing "The Zoological Gardens")

 

These lines are taken from "The Zoological Gardens" a traditional song:

 

Thunder and lightning is no lark

When Dublin City is in the dark

So if you've any money, go up to the park

And view the Zoological Gardens

 

We went up there to see the zoo

We saw the lion and the kangaroo

There was he-males and she-males of every hue

Up in the Zoological Gardens

 

We went out there by Castleknock

Says she to me "Sure, we'll court on the lock"

Then I knew she was one of the rare old stock

From outside the Zoological Gardens

 

Oh, thunder and lightning is no lark

When Dublin City is in the dark

So if you've any money, go up to the park

And view the Zoological Gardens

 

We went up there on our honeymoon

Says she to me "If you don't come soon

I'll have to get in with the hairy baboon"

Up in the Zoological Gardens

 

Says she to me "It's seven o'clock

And time for me to be changin' me frock

For I'd love to see that old cockatoo"

Up in the Zoological Gardens

 

Says she to me "Me lovely Jack

Sure I'd love a ride on the elephant's back

If you don't get out of that I'll give you such a crack"

Up in the Zoological Gardens

 

Oh, thunder and lightning is no lark

When Dublin City is in the dark

So if you've any money go up to the park

And view the Zoological Gardens

Page 118. " opposite the Custom House "

The Custom House, Dublin
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeThe Custom House, Dublin - Credit: TomAlt
The Custom House is an 18th century, neoclassical building located on the north bank of the Liffey. The building houses the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government.

 

 

Page 122. " The Helga "

The Helga was the ship that shelled Liberty Hall from the Liffey during the Easter Rising. When the Irish War of Independence got started, the Helga was used to transport British auxiliary troops (the Black and Tans) around the coast when many of the roads were made impassable by Irish forces. In August 1923, the Helga was handed over to the Irish Free State and renamed Muirchu (hound of the sea).

Page 123. " whether on the scaffold high or on the battlefield I die "

 

Lines taken from "God Save Ireland", an Irish rebel song, written by TD Sullivan in 1867. The song was inspired by Edmund O'Meager Condon's speech from the dock when he stood trial along with the three Manchester Martyrs. After the three were executed, the song became the song of the Fenian movement.

 

High upon the gallows tree, swung the noble-hearted three,

By the vengeful tyrant, stricken in their bloom.

But they met him face to face with the courage of their race,

And they went with souls undaunted to their doom.

 

"God save Ireland," said the heroes.

"God save Ireland," said them all.

"Whether on the scaffold high, or the battlefield we die,

No matter when, for Ireland dear we fall!"

 

Grit around with cruel foes, sure their courage proudly rose,

For they thought of hearts that loved them far and near.

Of the millions true and brave, o'er the ocean's swelling wave,

And the friends in Holy Ireland ever dear!

 

"God save Ireland," said the heroes.

"God save Ireland," said them all.

"Whether on the scaffold high, or the battlefield we die,

No matter when, for Ireland dear we fall!"

 

Climbed they up the rugged stair, rang their voices out in prayer,

Then with England's fatal cord about them cast.

Close beside the gallows tree, kissed like brothers lovingly,

True to home and faith, and freedom to the last!

 

"God save Ireland," said the heroes.

"God save Ireland," said them all.

"Whether on the scaffold high, or the battlefield we die,

No matter when, for Ireland dear we fall!"

 

Never 'til the latest day shall the memory pass away,

Of those gallant lives thus given for our land.

And on the cause must go, amidst joy and weal and woe,

'Til me make our isle a nation, free and grand!

 

"God save Ireland," said the heroes.

"God save Ireland," said them all.

"Whether on the scaffold high, or the battlefield we die,

No matter when, for Ireland dear we fall!"