Page 312. " the spy of Pitt "

William Pitt the Younger (1759–1806) was Britain's Prime Minister at the time of the French Revolution.

The second son of Pitt the Elder, Prime Minister from 1766 to 1768, Pitt was the youngest Prime Minister Britain has had to this day, achieving the position at the age of just twenty-four. He held the position twice: once from 1783 to 1801, and then again from 1804 until his death in 1806.

Pitt oversaw Britain's recovery following the American War of Independence. He was an important proponent of the abolition of the slave trade, and a determined enemy of Napoleon.

Page 315. " the Cow with the crumpled horn in the house that Jack built "

 This is the House that Jack Built is a British nursery rhyme. It first appeared in print in 1755, although its origins are probably much earlier. It is what is known as a cumulative tale, which involves a great deal of repetition, and builds up from verse to verse. Various versions of the nursery rhyme exist; in one version, the ‘cow with the crumpled horn’ is referred to in the fifth section like this:

                                                                 This is the cow with the crumpled horn

                                                                 That tossed the dog that worried the cat

                                                                 That killed the rat that ate the malt

                                                                 That lay in the house that Jack built. 

     

                                                

 

 

The example quoted above reaches a climax with the following verse:

 

                 

Illustrated book cover 1878
Public DomainIllustrated book cover 1878 - Credit: Randolph Caldecott
Illustrated book cover 1878
Public DomainIllustrated book cover 1878 - Credit: Randolph Caldecott

                  This is the horse and the hound and the horn 

                  That belonged to the farmer sowing his corn

                  That kept the cock that crowed in the morn

                  That woke the priest all shaven and shorn

                  That married the man all tattered and torn

                  That kissed the maiden all forlorn

                  That milked the cow with the crumpled horn

                  That tossed the dog that worried the cat

                  That killed the rat that ate the malt

                  That lay in the house that Jack built

                 

Page 325. " of to-morrow's and to-morrow's "
Ellen and Charles Kean as Lady Macbeth and Macbeth (1858)
Public DomainEllen and Charles Kean as Lady Macbeth and Macbeth (1858) - Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Echoing Macbeth's famous soliloquy in Shakespeare's tragedy after learning of the death of Lady Macbeth:

 

     She should have died hereafter;

     There would have been a time for such a word.

     Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,

     Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,

     To the last syllable of recorded time;

     And all our yesterdays have lighted fools

     The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!

     Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player

     That struts and frets his hour upon the stage

     And then is heard no more. It is a tale

     Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury

     Signifying nothing.

                                          (Act V, Scene V, 20-31)