This map plots the settings and references in Any Human Heart

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LONDON
Piccadilly Circus, looking up Shaftsbury Ave, circa 1949
Creative Commons AttributionPiccadilly Circus, looking up Shaftsbury Ave, circa 1949 - Credit: Chalmers Butterfield

London is, among many other things, a literary city. Within a few miles of the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey (home of Poet's Corner, where many famous writers are buried), Big Ben, St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace, hundreds of great writers have worked and lived. William Shakespeare, Samuel Pepys, John Milton and Charles Dickens were followed by many other extraordinary creative talents. 

When LMS arrived in London, its literary scene was thriving. The Bloomsbury Group, a set of writers, philosophers and other intellectuals, was at the height of its fame.

The printing press had also become much more efficient, with the 1930s and 1940s seeing the Platen Printing Press churn out several thousand impressions per hour.  News, novels and other printed publications were more readily available than ever. Fleet Street was becoming synonymous with the newspaper industry.

WW2 Blitz Damage
Public DomainWW2 Blitz Damage - Credit: US Government

London has long been a fashion capital, and never more so than in the Roaring Twenties.  The Prince of Wales, who would become LMS's nemesis, was a fashion icon, admired and emulated much like today's film stars.

The city was hard hit by World War 2.  It was subjected to intensive aerial bombardment, night after night, which left much of it in ruins and many civilians homeless or dead. LMS's experience would have been typical.

 

Underground to Wood Lane to anywhere: International Advertising Exhibition at the White City, November 29 to December 4, 1920.
Creative Commons AttributionUnderground to Wood Lane to anywhere: International Advertising Exhibition at the White City, November 29 to December 4, 1920. - Credit: trialsanderrors' photostream