"They watched the Delawares, of whom there were a number in the party,"
Lapowinsa, Chief of the Lenape (1737)
Public DomainLapowinsa, Chief of the Lenape (1737) - Credit: Library of Congress
Jennie Bobb, and her daughter, Nellie Longhat, both Delaware (Lenape), Oklahoma, 1915
Public DomainJennie Bobb, and her daughter, Nellie Longhat, both Delaware (Lenape), Oklahoma, 1915 - Credit: Smithsonian Institution

The Delawares was the name given by English settlers to several bands of culturally and linguistically related Native American peoples living along and around the Delaware River. The groups refer to themselves as Lenape, Lennape, or Lenapi (meaning ‘the people’), as well as the Lenni Lenape (the ‘true people’).

The Lenape originally inhabited a large section of northeastern America (known as the Northeastern Woodlands), until encroachment by white settlers displaced them. Today they live in Canada, and parts of Oklahoma and Wisconsin in the United States.