"A little Emerson? Ah, yes. Remember this one? You introduced it to me."
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) was a prominent member of the Transcendental Club
Public DomainRalph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) was a prominent member of the Transcendental Club - Credit: Southworth & Hawes

The poem is called 'Brahma' and ends:

The strong gods pine for my abode, 
  And pine in vain the sacred Seven; 
But thou, meek lover of the good!  
  Find me, and turn thy back on heaven.

 'Brahma' is a complex poem which draws on Emerson's religious faith and knowledge of Eastern philosophy. Emerson claimed that those baffled by the poem might be aided if they replaced the Brahma of the title (Brahman is the Hindu god of creation) with Jehova, indicating a belief that Eastern and Western religions could in large part be reconciled. The poem has been described as one that explores the 'continuity of life and the unity of the universe', the 'I' in the poem being God who is in all things, thus explaining why all seeming contradictions are as one. The Hindu belief in reincarnation, which sees death merely as a form of rebirth, can also be reconciled with the scientific dictum that energy can neither be destroyed nor created, merely transferred. No surprise, then, that 'Brahma' is a favourite of Hester Van Zandt, who is simultaneously scientist, eco-warrior, hippie and arts lover.