"I weren't nothin' jus' achin' an' helpless as a strung-up lardbird bein' bled form a hook."
The Hawaiian duck, of which there are now less than two thousand left.
Public DomainThe Hawaiian duck, of which there are now less than two thousand left. - Credit: Natural Resources Conservation Service

'Lardbird' might be a conscious contraction, or else an unwitting etymological derivative, of the common Mallard which, introduced onto the archipelago in the 1800's for hunting and domestic purposes, breeds in profusion on the larger islands. The feral Mallard is to be distinguished from the endangered Hawaiian Duck (native name Koloa) which is unique to Hawaii and is threatened by continued interbreeding with the feral mallard, so much so that the latter is starting to be culled. The Koloa, smaller and a darker brown that its common cousin, is a shy creature and shuns numbers, and will often be found as one of a pair  in remote wetlands or streams. Its more gregarious cousin, however, will be found in flocks and almost anywhere vaguely wet, even near urban areas.