"found him of a very marked physiognomy"
Illustration from a 19th century book about Physiognomy (on the left, 'Utter Despair', on the right, 'Rage Mixed with Fear')
Public DomainIllustration from a 19th century book about Physiognomy (on the left, 'Utter Despair', on the right, 'Rage Mixed with Fear') - Credit: wikimedia commons

 Physiognomy is the science of reading a person’s character and personality from their appearance, particularly the face. The theory was accepted amongst the ancient Greeks, fell out of favour in the Middle Ages, and gained a new popularity in the 19th century (Bram Stoker’s time). It is not generally taken seriously today, though new research may suggest a correlation between face width and aggression. Elsewhere in 19th century supernatural literature, physiognomy forms an underlying theme in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, and features prominently in the stories of Edgar Allan Poe.

 

The Picture of Dorian Gray on Book Drum