"He always carried a copy of Cicero's 'De oficiis (On Duties)"
Marcus Tullius Cicero by Bertel Thorvaldsen as a copy from a Roman original in Thorvaldsen's Museum, Copenhagen
Public DomainMarcus Tullius Cicero by Bertel Thorvaldsen as a copy from a Roman original in Thorvaldsen's Museum, Copenhagen - Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cicero, 106BC-43BC was a Roman philosopher, statesman and lawyer who produced many works during his lifetime, earning him the reputation of being one of the most influential Roman orators and prose stylists.  His De Oficiis, written towards the end of his life, is a series of essays on the subject of how to live, to behave and to observe moral obligations.  It takes the form of a letter to his son and was published after Cicero's death.  In the book, in which he criticises the recently deposed dictator Julius Caesar, he advises on how to live and not just on how to rule.

 

Cicero uses anecdote to illustrate the points he is trying to get across, as Roger Ascham, a tutor of Greek and Latin to Elizabeth I, used anecdote, in his case of the young Elizabeth, to put across his views on education.