"The gates of the Charterhouse still survive."
The Tudor gateway into the London Charterhouse. 2008
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeThe Tudor gateway into the London Charterhouse. 2008 - Credit: Alan Murray-Rust

Charterhouse, London dates back to the 14th century as a Carthusian priory, after which it takes its name.  After 1537, it was redeveloped into a large house until it became an almshouse and school in 1611, when it was extended. 

 

The priory was dissolved in 1537, but, as the priory attempted to resist, it suffered accordingly.  The prior, because he supported Thomas More in his resistance to the King's plan to marry Anne Boleyn, was hanged, drawn and quartered, and one of his 'quarters' was nailed to the gates.  Of the ten other monks who were imprisoned, nine starved themselves to death and the tenth was executed three years later.

 

St Hugo of Grenoble in the Carthusian Refectory by Francisco de Zurbaran. 1630-1635.
Public DomainSt Hugo of Grenoble in the Carthusian Refectory by Francisco de Zurbaran. 1630-1635. - Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

The Carthusian Order (Order of St Bruno) of Roman Catholic Monks is an enclosed order dating back to the 11th century.  The name 'Carthusian' originates from the Chartreuse Mountains, where St Bruno built his first hermitage.  'Charterhouse' is the English name, deriving from the same source, for a Carthusian monastery.