"a Goldilocks settlement: neither too hot nor too cold."
The Three Bears From The Project Gutenberg eBook, English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel, Illustrated by Arthur Rackham
Public DomainThe Three Bears From The Project Gutenberg eBook, English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel, Illustrated by Arthur Rackham - Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Goldilocks and the Three Bears, a favourite children's story, describes how a little girl named Goldilocks comes across a house.  Finding no-one at home she tastes the three bowls of porridge left on the table.  One is too hot, one is too cold but the third is just right.  Goldilocks eats the porridge, much to the dismay of the occupants of the house when they return home.  These turn out to be three bears.  Goldilocks has eaten baby bear's porridge.  There are various versions, differing slightly, but the outcome is OK as Goldilocks gets away.

 

The story was first recorded in the 19th century by Robert Southey in narrative form and by George Nicol in verse.  Both told the story of three bears and an old woman who wanders into their house.  The bears were also bachelors.  By the early 20th century, the old woman had changed into a little girl, 'Goldilocks' and the bachelor bears into Mummy, Daddy and Baby Bear.