Page 302. " makes Diana of the Ephesians look positively nipple-less "

Artemis of Ephesus. 1st century CE Roman copy of the cult statue of the Temple of Ephesus.
Public DomainArtemis of Ephesus. 1st century CE Roman copy of the cult statue of the Temple of Ephesus. - Credit: Pvasiliadis
The Ionian city of Ephesus was known for its temple to Artemis, or Diana.

Diana of the Ephesians was the goddess of fertility and was depicted as many-breasted, hence Aziraphale’s comment. She is also mentioned in Acts 19:28, where Ephesian metal-smiths shouted her defence, “Great is Diana of the Ephesians” against St Paul’s preaching of Christianity.

Page 302. " Or the Shiv of Kali? "

goddess kali ma
Creative Commons Attributiongoddess kali ma - Credit: alicepopkorn / Alice / Cornelia Kopp
 Kali is a Hindu goddess, consort to Shiva, associated with eternal energy and the manifestation of time. Kali is tasked with the destruction of the world at the end of the fourth age, after which a new life cycle begins.

One of her four hands holds a sword: this may be the Shiv Aziraphale refers to.

Page 320. " A plaque on both your houses "
Romeo und Julia / L’ultimo bacio dato a Giulietta da Romeo
Public DomainRomeo und Julia - Credit: Francesco Hayez

Brian’s quotation is almost but not quite there. It should be “a plague on both your houses”.

Mercutio utters this line in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet after he has been mortally wounded.