Page 58. " He is the only man of whom Barbecue was afraid "
Even Legendary Pirate Long John Silver was Afraid of Captain Hook
Public DomainEven Legendary Pirate Long John Silver was Afraid of Captain Hook - Credit: N. C. Wyeth

Barrie boosts Captain Hook's fearsome reputation by comparing him to Robert Louis Stevenson's legendary Quartermaster in Treasure Island (1912), Long John Silver. Responsible for food and water rations, (hence the name Barbecue), he struck fear into the heart of many pirates. Like Hook, Long John Silver "had good schooling":

 

Page 66. " A more villanous-looking lot never hung in a row on Execution dock "
The Location of Execution Dock in London
Public DomainThe Location of Execution Dock in London - Credit: John Rocque 1746

For those convicted of a nefarious crime at sea, Execution Dock awaited. Located on the River Thames in London's Wapping area, the dock witnessed many hangings over a 400-year period. The British Admiralty handled all nautical crimes; pirates in particular faced a gruesome death.

Piracy was considered one of the worst crimes that a man could commit. Consequently, the hangmen would shorten the rope so that the fall was not long enough to break the neck. The result was a slow and painful strangling, which caused the body to jerk about wildly. It came to be called the Marshal's Dance, and many danced their last jig on London's Execution Dock.

 

Execution Dock at Madame Tussauds
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumExecution Dock at Madame Tussauds - Credit: Wolcott @ Wikimedia Commons

 

Madame Tussauds has recreated Execution Dock; its victim, however, is a figure of wax.

 

 

 

           

Page 69. " For these are the Piccaninny tribe and not to be confused with the softer-hearted Delawares or the Hurons "
Colonel Henry Bouquet Holds a Peace Treaty with Three Tribes, the Senecas, Delawares, and Shawnees at Tuscacawas in Ohio in October 1764
Public DomainColonel Henry Bouquet Holds a Peace Treaty with Three Tribes, the Senecas, Delawares, and Shawnees at Tuscacawas in Ohio in October 1764 - Credit: John Carter Brown

The Piccaninny Tribe exists only in Barrie's imagination. The Delawares and Hurons are genuine tribes in Native American history.

The Delawares dwelt along the banks of the Delaware River. Lenape (len-NAH-pay), their name in the Algonquian language, simply means "The People". They were the first native Americans to come in contact with Europeans, and were known peacemakers. The Delawares signed the first Indian treaty with the newly formed United States Government on September 17, 1778. As a result of persecution, they were forced to migrate, sometimes as far away as Canada.

 

The Huron Tribe, also called the Wyandot, consisted of sub-tribes or clans: the Arendahronon, the Attigneenongnahac, the Attignawantan and the Tahontaenrat. The Wyandot Nation was a force to be reckoned with and boasts a history marked by battles and wars. Known for having a well-defined governmental system, in 1535 the tribe numbered 30,000-45,000, but epidemics and wars hit them hard; by 1640, their population numbered around 10,000. The Huron Tribe was eventually forced onto reservations.

 

A 1655 chart of the Delaware Rive
Public DomainA 1655 chart of the Delaware Rive - Credit: Peter Lindstrom