"Mr Gladraeli and Mr Dizzystone"

In the period of 1866-1867, the parties led by Gladstone and Disraeli clashed over voting reform.  While Gladstone and his Liberal (Whig) Party were officially in favour of allowing more people voting rights, and Disraeli and the Conservative (Tory) Party were opposed to this, both voted for and against different reform bills in this period. Disraeli's Conservatives voted against Gladstone's 1866 bill, but voted for Disraeli's own, similar bill in 1867.

The reason for this was political.  Athough this was immensely unpopular with much of his own party, Disraeli calculated that those enabled to vote by his bill would reward his party by voting for them at the next election.  Gladstone's party wanted to avoid this happening. The gamble did not pay off: the Conservatives lost the next election.

Punch cartoon of 1867, showing Disraeli (leading rider) and Gladstone (far left)
Public DomainPunch cartoon of 1867, showing Disraeli (leading rider) and Gladstone (far left)