Page 185. " moth-eaten tapestries (Gobelins) "

The Gobelin family gave their name to the tapestries produced by their manufactory in Paris.  Originally dyers, the family began to manufacture tapestries in the 17th century, enjoying the patronage of several Kings of France.  The manufactory survives today and is owned and run by the French state.

 

The Lady and the Unicorn
Public DomainThe Lady and the Unicorn
Page 185. " dull paintings (including two Claudes and a Tintoretto) "

Claude Lorrain (1600-1682) was a French landscape painter described by later artist Constable as "the most perfect landscape painter the world ever saw".

Jacopo Tintoretto (1518-1594) is considered the last great painter of the Italian Renaissance. His work focuses mainly on biblical and religious themes.

The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba, by Claude
Public DomainThe Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba, by Claude
The Miracle of the Slave by Tintoretto
Public DomainThe Miracle of the Slave by Tintoretto

Page 187. " those picturesque old gables "

Breamore House, an Elizabethan manor house with gables
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeBreamore House, an Elizabethan manor house with gables - Credit: Mike Searle
Gables are the triangular sections of wall below a sloping roof and are a common feature of Elizabethan architecture.

 

Page 187. " a second Crystal Palace "
Engraving of the front of Crystal Palace
Public DomainEngraving of the front of Crystal Palace

The Crystal Palace was a cast iron and glass exhibition hall constructed in London for the Great Exhibition of 1851.  With an interior space of 92,000 square metres and a height of 33m (large enough to accomodate full-sized living elm trees) it was a spectacular building.

It was first erected in Hyde Park, then reassembled after the Exhibition in south London.  It was destroyed by fire in 1936.

Page 189. " The chaise, its calash "

A chaise was a light-weight horse-drawn carriage designed to carry one or two people.  A calash was a folding hood that could be drawn down over the seats in the chaise, as shown in the illustration below.  The carriage in this illustration does not have a box, which is a seat for the coachman, usually but not always between the passengers and the horses.

Illustration of a chaise with calash, by Pearson Scott Foresman
Public DomainIllustration of a chaise with calash, by Pearson Scott Foresman
Page 189. " a perfect casting for Baucis "

Baucis is a old woman who appears in a myth from Ancient Greece and is a stock figure of friendly hospitality.

Page 191. " Mrs Tomkins's Landau "
Landau in museum tableau
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeLandau in museum tableau - Credit: Hugo90

A Landau was a relatively expensive four-wheeled carriage pulled by four horses, with retractable roofs, two seats for passengers facing each other and a box for a driver.

Page 191. " a Palladian structure "

Palladian architecture is a style of building which imitates ancient Greek temples.

Woburn Abbey, an example of English Palladian architecture
Public DomainWoburn Abbey, an example of English Palladian architecture