Page 236. " certain scenes would present themselves to her sometimes, like tableaux vivants "

Tableaux vivant is French for 'living picture'. The tradition started in the middle ages, when brief tableaux would be used within religious and state ceremonies and occasions.

Later, in the 19th Century, Parlour Tableaux became very popular in Europe as a form of social entertainment. A group of people posed to replicate and express a scene from a famous painting or play. Accounts of this activity can be found in many novels of the period, as described in a very interesting article on a blog called At The Lighthouse. There is a very detailed description of how tableaux vivants were set up in an on-line book called Home Pastimes; or Tableaux Vivants, by James H. Head.

In the Victorian era, the tradition developed into something called poses plastique, which involved actresses, sometimes with very few clothes, on posing as famous statues.

An American example of the use of the technique can be seen in the photographs of Kate Seston Matthews (1870-1956), in Louisville, Kentucky. Her photographs create tableaux vivants based on nursery rhymes, fairy tales, poetry, and other works of art. Her collection is preserved at the University of Louisville Photographic Archives, and is available to view on-line, but here are some examples which they have kindly given permission to be displayed here.

  

Elizabeth Brackett as Alice in Wonderland, circa 1932.
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumElizabeth Brackett as Alice in Wonderland, circa 1932. - Credit: University of Louisville Photographic Archives
 
Elizabeth Fletcher as Lady Macbeth.
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumElizabeth Fletcher as Lady Macbeth. - Credit: University of Louisville Photographic Archives

                                 
Helen Robinson as statue.
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumHelen Robinson as statue. - Credit: University of Louisville Photographic Archives

For two modern interpretations of tableaux vivant, have a look at the work of Tori Amos and Cindy Sherman.

Page 249. " they zoom towards Claridge's, they go in through the revolving doors "

Claridge's is one of the most famous grand London hotels, and it is in Mayfair, one of the wealthiest parts of the city. It has had a reputation for attracting royalty, world leaders, and celebrities.In an article about bohemian London on his website, journalist Nick Ryan tells us that 'guests have included the Italian fascist leader Benito Mussolini and US general Dwight Eisenhower (who said his room looked like "a goddamn fancy funeral parlour decorated in whorehouse pink").'

Claridges Hotel, Mayfair
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeClaridges Hotel, Mayfair - Credit: Tim Westcott, Wikimedia Commons

At the end of 2009 Claridge's used it's website's home page to draw attention to an exhibition that was held at the National Portrait Gallery, celebrating the Swinging Sixties, subtitled Beatles to Bowie, which maybe gives an idea of how fame and fashion are important to the Claridge's ambience and history.