"he said he thought it might be by one of the Huguenot silversmiths working in London in the mid-eighteenth century, perhaps by Paul de Lamerie"
Silver kettle and tripod by Paul de Lamerie
Public DomainSilver kettle and tripod by Paul de Lamerie - Credit: Daderot

 The Huguenots were followers of the theologian John Calvin and members of the Protestant Reformed Church in 16th and 17th century France. Because of religious persecution, about half a million Hugeuenots were forced to flee France and settle in countries sympathetic to the Protestant faith, such as England, Scotland, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Sweden.

Silver cake basket and stand by Paul de Lamerie and Paul Storr
Creative Commons AttributionSilver cake basket and stand by Paul de Lamerie and Paul Storr - Credit: Sean Pathasema/Birmingham Museum of Art

 Paul de Lamerie (1688-1751) was a Dutch-born silversmith whose father, a Huguenot, had been forced to leave France in 1685. The de Lamerie family later moved to London where Paul eventually became apprenticed to the Hugeunot goldsmith* Pierre Platel. He established his own business in 1713, and became an acclaimed silversmith, particularly renowned for pieces in the Rococo style.

* goldsmiths were capable of working with both gold and silver.