Page 52. " he left the safe in his Wagoneer while he approached the house "
Jeep Wagoneer
GNU Free Documentation LicenseJeep Wagoneer - Credit: Sfoskett

The Jeep Wagoneer was the first luxury 4x4 and set a precedent that many in the US automotive industry would follow. The style is very evocative of rural and suburban America.

 

Page 53. " the smooth gold metal of the Pennsylvania keystone "
A keystone shape
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumA keystone shape - Credit: Susannah Worth

A keystone shape is illustrated here. Pennsylvania's association with the motif is long-standing but its origins aren't entirely clear. A keystone is the wedge-shaped stone at the top of an arch that locks the structure in place; Pennsylvania's central position on the Eastern Seaboard of the USA – geographically, economically and in historical importance – may be the reason for the association.

Page 54. " I watched Mr. Harvey read a book on the Dogon and Bambara of Mali. "

The Dogon and Bambara peoples form a large proportion of the Mali population. Though distinct ethnic groups, their sculpture and carvings share many similar characteristics.

 

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Page 58. " he does a Bronson on them and everyone cheers. "

Not to be confused with the American actor, Charles Bronson is a British criminal. Previously a bare-knuckle boxer in the East End of London, he is notoriously violent and infamous for being a troublemaker and taking prison staff and fellow inmates hostage on numerous occasions.

 

   

Page 70. " When Lindsay and I played Barbies, Barbie and Ken got married at sixteen. "
Barbie and Ken
GNU Free Documentation LicenseBarbie and Ken - Credit: Joe Mabel

 

     
Page 74. " A sort of Black Like Me version of the Moor. "

Black Like Me is a book by John Howard Griffin, charting his experiences of travelling through the racially segregated southern states of the USA in the early 1960s, having darkened his skin so as to pass as a black man. Earning a great deal of attention – and controversy – it was, in many ways, a groundbreaking book that did a lot to aid human rights, but the project was much criticised.