"and he made for the top of a mound that was above the court, called Gorsedd Arberth"
Brown Low barrow near Marple, Greater Manchester
Creative Commons Attribution Share AlikeBrown Low barrow near Marple, Greater Manchester - Credit: Dave Dunford

Arberth (which is also referred to in the opening lines of ‘The First Branch’) is generally assumed to be Arberth in southeast Pembrokeshire, the English name of which is Narberth. In modern Welsh, gorsedd means throne, but  it is also an archaic term for the type of mound known as a barrow or tumulus.

Barrows are mounds of earth or stone, constructed from the prehistoric period up until about 800 AD. On excavation, they have often been found to contain stone artifacts, pottery, and animal or human bones. Burial of the dead was generally believed to be their main function, but it is now accepted that their role may have been more complex.

It has been suggested that a possible site for Gorsedd Arberth is an Iron Age Enclosure south of Narberth, known as Camp Hill. Click here and here for more information.