"Ye are the just Pharisee"

Baroque fresco depicting the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican in Ottobeuren Abbey, Bavaria
GNU Free Documentation LicenseBaroque fresco depicting the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican in Ottobeuren Abbey, Bavaria - Credit: Johannes Böckh & Thomas Mirtsch
The Pharisees are a Jewish sect that appears frequently in the New Testament. They insisted on a strict observance of Jewish law and emphasised faith in one God, the teachings of Moses, the words of the prophets and the promise of eternal life for those who abided by the law. The passage which John Barnet paraphrases comes from Luke 18:10-14, which tells the parable of the Pharisee and the publican. The fact that Rev. Wringhim fails to fully understand the criticism implied in this again indicates his superficial understanding of the Bible’s teachings.

Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.”