"I put on his green frock coat, buff belt, and a sort of turban that he always wore on his head"

Portrait of Tuguzhoko Kizbech Sheretluko, the military leader of the Circassians in 1810, demonstrating the kind of attire favoured by Gil-Martin
Public DomainPortrait of Tuguzhoko Kizbech Sheretluko, the military leader of the Circassians in 1810, demonstrating the kind of attire favoured by Gil-Martin - Credit: James Stanislaw Bell

Gil-Martin’s habitual attire is specified on p. 216 as being Circassian. This is an alternative alias for the Adyghe, an indigenous people who were amongst the original inhabitants of the Caucasus. During the late 18th and early 19th centuries, they lost their independence and were slowly conquered by Russia in a brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing. That Gil-Martin allows himself to pass with Robert as Peter the Great whilst wearing the traditional costume of his enemy can again be seen as a taunt. He brazenly flaunts his hypocrisy before his victim, delighting in the fact that Robert will fail to fully comprehend its import.