Page 55. " He tried to remember the rules of childhood games. Old Maid. Some version of Whist. "
Cards
Creative Commons AttributionCards - Credit: jenX5, Flickr 

Old Maid and Whist are two classic card games. Old Maid is a Victorian game: the basic aim is to avoid being the player left holding the 'Old Maid', a card that will have been singled out at the beginning (usually the ace of spades, queen of spades or joker).

Whist, another classic English card game, was popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. It's a trick-taking game, with more modernised versions known as trumps.

 

Page 62. " Some of them wearing canister masks. One in a biohazard suit. "
Alaska (11.05.07) – Members of the National Guard's civil support team board Military Sealift Command (MSC) fleet replenishment oilder USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO 187) in biohazard suits to investigate a simulated report of suspicious chemicals.
Public DomainAlaska (11.05.07) – Members of the National Guard's civil support team board Military Sealift Command (MSC) fleet replenishment oilder USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO 187) in biohazard suits to investigate a simulated report of suspicious chemicals.
Biohazard symbol
Public DomainBiohazard symbol
Page 63. " He could see a break through the trees "
The Roundtop Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, passing through a thick pine-oak forest.
Creative Commons AttributionThe Roundtop Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, passing through a thick pine-oak forest. - Credit: Brian Stansberry, 23 February 2008
The city through which the pair have just passed was probably Knoxville, Tennessee; they are now heading south, across an area of woods and rivers, on the way to the Great Smoky Mountains.
Page 65. " He was lean, wiry, rachitic. "

The word rachitic means that the man had the appearance of someone with rickets, a disease resulting from a lack of vitamin D or calcium and from insufficient exposure to sunlight. It is characterised by defective bone growth.

Page 71. " he rose and walked out and cut a perimeter about their siwash camp "

Siwash can be an offensive term for a North American Indian, but here it refers to a camp made without a tent or any proper supplies; living off the land and using only natural shelter.