"a wig of majestic frizzle; which, unlike the head that it once adorned, was in very satisfactory preservation"
Illustration mocking the preposterous fashions in wigs in the mid-18th century
Public DomainIllustration mocking the preposterous fashions in wigs in the mid-18th century - Credit: William Hogarth

This detail is pulled from the article in The Salem Observer, which reported: “His wig was in a good state of preservation and his worsted sash was not entirely decayed; three silver buttons were also found in his grave.” Wigs were a standard feature of male attire during the eighteenth century in America as in Europe, and were worn by all social classes. Those in fashion when Pue was interred were voluminous spectacles of long cascading curls made of horse, goat or human hair (the latter being the most expensive). A liberal dusting of powder, used to provide the fashionable white tint, had the additional benefit of disguising unpleasant smells.

A wig of majestic frizzle
Public DomainA wig of majestic frizzle - Credit: Nicolas de Largillière