"cornice and façade flowed smoothly once more from left to right; post and tree, window and doorway, and signboard, each in its ordered place."
The direction Benjy insists on travelling round Courthouse Square
Public DomainThe direction Benjy insists on travelling round Courthouse Square - Credit: Google maps

As Daniel Singal points out, the significance of this somewhat puzzling conclusion is revealed by the locational clues which Faulkner gives us. The safety ritual on which Benjy’s precarious sense of order depends involves travelling right round the square and watching as shapes flow from left to right. He therefore keeps his gaze unwaveringly fixed on the square’s perimeter, away from the statue at its centre. His idiocy, it seems, does not prevent a primal understanding of what that Confederate soldier represents, nor an appalled feeling of kinship with him. Being forced to confront this directly is the transgression of a deeply-engrained taboo, the shock of which causes his world — temporarily, at least — to shatter.