Page 142. " And the way the clouds moved, mostly invisible, above the canopy of trees, now revealing the full light of the sun, now obscuring it, now diffusing it, reflecting it, and the way it sparkled and trickled and gushed and flooded and spun, and the way the wind dispersed it even more among the flickering leaves and twitching grass, all combined to make Howard feel as if he were walking through a kaleidoscope. "
Fractal-like Geometry of Frost on a Window
Public DomainFractal-like Geometry of Frost on a Window - Credit: Mark A. Wilson

Howard’s father has been taken away by four men in black coats. In a state of shock, Howard searches for traces of his father in the woods. As he makes his way toward Tagg Pond, he experiences his first epileptic seizure; his vision shatters and splinters as though he is looking through the lens of a kaleidoscope

Some pre-epileptic auras are described as visual star showers, waves of color, flower-like, abstracted patterns that are almost fractal in nature. Fractal geometry finds underlying patterns and forms in nature – clouds, snowflakes, ocean waves, the nautilus shell, leaves and tree branches –these patterns can resemble the faceted images seen in a kaleidoscope.

Page 147. " I thought the Indian must be Old Sabbatis. Sabbatis had grown up living on an island in the lake before he went to live with Red in his cabin. "

There was – and is – a Native American family named Sabattus

Sabattus Lola and d Sabattus Mitchell at the Maine Centennial, 1920
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumSabattus Lola and Sabattus Mitchell at the Maine Centennial, 1920 - Credit: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Mitchell Sabattus was a pure-blooded Indian of the Abenaki tribe. His father, Pierjon (Captain Peter Sabattus), fought with the Americans in the Revolution and the War of 1812. Both Mitchell and his father were known for their abilities as a hunters and trappers.

Page 150. " It may have been Old Sabbatis who repaired my father’s canoe every spring, not long after the ice had gone out of the ponds and lakes. He seemed to me as old as light and just as diffuse. "
thian Lewey, 85 years old, at Grand Lake-1898
Permission Granted by Copyright Owner for Use on Book DrumAthian Lewey, 85 years old, at Grand Lake-1898 - Credit: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

    

 

The birchbark canoe was first used by the Algonquin Indians in what is now the northeastern part of the United States and adjacent Canada.

In the summer months the bark of the birch is easily removed in large sheets, making it possible to create large canoes. In traditional construction, the bark was sewn together with roots and caulked with resin; sheathing and ribs were pressed into the sheet of bark, which was hung from a gunwale temporarily supported by stakes.