allez
‘go’, in this case ‘go away’ (second person plural of French verb ‘aller’, to go)
AmEx
shortened form of American Express, an American financial services corporation
arrivederci
Italian for ‘goodbye’
baht
the official national currency of Thailand. The baht is subdivided into satang (1 baht = 100 satang) and there are currently around 50 baht to 1 British pound
benvenuto
Italian word meaning ‘welcome’
buongiorno
Italian word for ‘good morning’
CEO
abbreviation of Chief Executive Officer, an originally American term for the managing director of a company
cerulean
a classical term which refers to various shades of blue, from light to dark. Most commonly it refers to a bright sky blue (the word ‘cerulean’ comes from the Latin ‘caelum’, meaning ‘sky’)
charlatan
from the French ‘charlatan’, meaning a confidence trickster
condo
short for ‘condominium’ – an American term for an apartment within a larger building which is usually owned rather than rented by the occupant
enoteca
an Italian word which translates as ‘wine repository’ – a small wine shop which allows customers to taste and buy a selection of local wines along with small snacks
fairway
the area on a golf course between the teeing box and the putting green, on which the grass is cut short and evenly to allow the ball to be easily hit
feccia
Italian word meaning ‘trash’ or ‘dregs’
Firenze
the Italian name for the city of Florence. The name originally came from the Latin ‘Fluentia’, as the city is situated between two rivers
fresco
from the Italian word ‘affresco’, rooted in the Latin word for ‘fresh’. A fresco is a mural painting which is part of a series, found as a decorative element on walls or ceilings
Gallic
of or relating to France
geometra
a uniquely Italian profession in real estate. The geometra fills the role of a surveyor in inspecting a building for potential buyers but also carries out some of the work usually done by a solicitor in advance of the house purchase
gigolo
Italian word, also used commonly in English and some other languages, for a male escort or prostitute
Hollywood
a form of female waxing, in which all the pubic hair is removed from the genital area
kaftan
an ankle-length tunic-like coat which buttons up the front, worn in Islamic cultures by men and women (in Morocco, only by women)
latte
in Italian, ‘latte’ means ‘milk’; however, the term used in English is an abbreviation of ‘caffelatte’, a popular coffee-based drink made with espresso and steamed milk
Maître d’
the maître d’hôtel is the front of house manager of a restaurant, in charge of waiting staff, reservations, welcoming and seating guests
medina
a city district found in North African cities, which is often walled. The streets are labyrinthine and narrow, so restricted to foot and bicycle traffic. Fountains, mosques and historic palaces can often be found in these areas
meretrice
Italian word for a female prostitute
mezzanine
from the Italian ‘mezzano’, meaning ‘middle’, a mezzanine is an extra floor or level between the main lower floors of a building. It usually projects from the walls between two floors but does not completely close off the floor below it, thus taking the form of a large balcony. Mezzanine floors are popularly found in large public or industrial buildings, such as theatres or factories
osteria
a small and often inexpensive Italian restaurant serving food and wine
pazzo
Italian word for ‘mad’ or ‘crazy’
penthouse
a term, originally American, for a luxury apartment on one of the highest floors of a building
plus-fours
loose breech-like trousers which extend four inches below the knees and are traditionally associated with sports, especially golf
prosecco
an Italian white wine, usually sparkling, which is known as a cheaper substitute for champagne. Prosecco is made from Glera grapes primarily in the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions of Italy
quad-vod
a quadruple shot of vodka
rednecks
derogatory slang used to refer to poor white farmers from the southern states of America, whose necks were burned red from long hours working in the fields under the sun
rhinestone
a manufactured jewel stone, made from rock crystal, glass or acrylic, which looks similar to a diamond. The name derives from the first rhinestones, which were made using rock crystals collected from the European river Rhine in the 18th century
sarong
a long, wide piece of usually coloured fabric which is wrapped around the waist and worn as a skirt. Sarongs are commonly worn by men and women in Southern Asia, the Arab Peninsula, Pacific Islands and the Horn of Africa, and have become popular items of women’s beach wear in many Western countries
semantics
the study of meaning, focusing on how ideas are signified in relation to their meaning. The word is used in everyday language to express the problem of understanding based on how an idea is expressed with chosen words or phrases
signor
Italian form of address, equal to ‘Mister’ or ‘Sir’
sommelier
a wine steward who works in a formal restaurant, specially trained in wine and how to pair it with food
steering committee
in business, a group set up to set agendas and business schedules
tagliatelle
a long, flat ribbon of pasta, traditionally served with Bolognese or meat sauce, which hails from the Emilia-Romagna and Marches regions of Italy
Trust
a legal entity in which a person leaves some assets to be held and managed on their behalf, often to benefit another person
valise
a small travelling case or overnight bag
Venetian blinds
a commonly used window blind, which is made of basic horizontal slats of metal, plastic or wood. First patented in England in 1760 by Gowin Knight, it is thought that the blinds originally came from France where they were found earlier than this date
viticulture
the science, study and growing of grapes
Wag
or WAG - an acronym made popular during the 2006 by the British press to describe the Wives and Girlfriends of top footballers
Wi-Fi
technology first patented in 1999, allowing electronic devices to exchange data via radio waves and issue high-speed Internet connections